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Convincing Coin Magic

by Victor Farelli
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Convincing Coin Magic by Victor Farelli

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A Practical Treatise on Coin Sleights and Effects with 54 explanatory photographs and diagrams.

Farelli was regarded by his fellow magicians as "beyond all other writers on conjuring in that he sought not only to explain the 'how-to' in minute detail, down to the last crook of the little finger, but he also threw in a thousand asides—the origin of the trick, a bibliography, alternative props or moves the performer might use, a quote from David Devant, the psychology behind the feat, audience reaction to it, and tips on practicing" (Robert Lund). Contains a select bibliography of coin magic.

Paul Fleming wrote:

This new work by Mr. Farelli, who is well known for his books on card magic and the linking rings, consists of ten chapters which vary in length from two to seventeen pages.

The first six chapters, comprising half of the explanatory material, deal almost exclusively with methods of "vanishing" a coin. They include eleven pages of sleight-of-hand methods; eight pages that describe two "coin folds," the first for vanishing a coin and the second for changing one coin into another; and seventeen pages which explain thirteen ways to vanish a coin that is wrapped in a handkerchief - in seven instances the performer's own property and specially prepared, and in six cases quite unprepared and indeed borrowed.

There are four chapters of tricks. Chapter VII, entitled Bang Went a Penny, describes only a sharper's trick in which a coin, wrapped (together with a brass ring) in a bit of paper, is later found to have disappeared. Chapter VIII is a five-page, very detailed explanation of a first-class method (Chung Ling Soo's) of doing The Coin in the Ball of Wool, in a form suitable for either stage or drawing-room presentation. Chapter IX presents (in eight pages, with six illustrations) The Puzzling Plates, in which a borrowed coin is caused to vanish, only to reappear between two metal slabs (fastened together tightly by means of fourteen rubber bands) that are taken from the performer's purse, which is closed not only by the usual catch but with two heavy rubber bands as well. Chapter X, A Complete Coin Act, is thus described by the author; "Four coins are 'caught' in the air. The four coins having been dropped into a cocktail shaker, several more are produced, singly, and thrown in with the others. As an interlude, a coin is vanished and reproduced. Picking up the shaker, the performer continues the production. The last 'catch' consists of a handful of coins which are also dropped into the shaker. The upper section of the cocktail mixer is placed in position, and the coins are shaken up. Upon removing the lid, the coins are seen to have multiplied." Seventeen pages and eighteen illustrations are given over to the explanation of this "act."

It will be evident that Convincing Coin Magic, though it is doubtless (as is stated in the subtitle) "a practical treatise on coin sleights and effects," is by no means an exhaustive one. Nor can it be said to be notable for the presentation of startlingly new material. Its chief merit lies in the great thoroughness with which Mr. Farelli has explained the four "routines" that are included in the book, and in his personal observations at the beginning and end of the book and the bits of advice he gives in connection with certain sleights and tricks.

This is a volume of 91 pages, including title-page, table of contents, and other "front material." There are 30 photographic halftones and 24 line cuts, making a total of 54 illustrations. The book is printed on coated paper, bound in blue cloth, and gold-stamped on the front cover - but not on the spine where a title is of greatest usefulness.

1st edition 1946 George Armstrong; original 92 pages; PDF 83 pages.

Table of Contents

  1. PREFACE

    ENTRE NOUS

  2. DIGITAL ABILITY 10
  3. PRACTICE AND SURPRISE
  4. THE QUACK CONJURER
  5. AN ARTIST IN MAGIC
  6. EXPERIENCE VERSUS THEORY
  7. THE FIXED ROUTINE

    LEST WE FORGET

  8. One
  9. Two
  10. Three
  11. Four
  12. Five

    CHAPTER I COINS

  13. THE OWEN CLARK METHOD OF MILLING
  14. COINS FOR BACK PALMING
  15. SPECIAL PALMING COINS

    CHAPTER II "VANISHES" Sleight of Hand Methods

  16. THE "CLIP" AND "PALM" COMBINATION
  17. THE OKITO "SLAP"
  18. THE "SIMPLICITY" VANISH

    CHAPTER III PALMING AND "ACQUITMENTS"

  19. THE TRANSFER
  20. PUZZLING "ACQUITMENTS"
  21. CONVINCING ACQUITMENTS
  22. FINGER PALMING A "STACK"

    CHAPTER IV "COIN FOLDING"

  23. STANDARD METHOD OF FOLDING
  24. MONEY FOR NOTHING

    CHAPTER V PREPARED HANDKERCHIEFS

  25. Section One Dummy Coin in Corner of Handkerchief
  26. Section Two Faked Handkerchiefs and Scarfs

    CHAPTER VI WITH A BORROWED HANDKERCHIEF

  27. THE SHOME SYSTEM
  28. TOPIT
  29. A PURE SWINDLE
  30. THE RUBBER BAND METHOD
  31. THE FOLD METHOD
  32. BY MEANS OF A PULL

    CHAPTER VII BANG WENT A PENNY!

  33. A SHARPER'S TRICK

    CHAPTER VIII A CHUNG LING SOO MASTERPIECE

    CHAPTER IX THE PUZZLING PLATES

    CHAPTER X A COMPLETE COIN ACT

  34. APPARATUS AND ARRANGEMENT
  35. A SPECIAL SLEIGHT OR "MOVE"
  36. REMARKS ANENT BACK PALMING
  37. MUSIC
  38. PRESENTATION

    POSTFACE

  39. PARADE OF DEXTERITY
  40. CASTING A SPELL
  41. A FINAL WORD
  42. BIBLIOGRAPHY

word count: 22235 which is equivalent to 88 standard pages of text

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