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Read What Christian Fisanick Is Saying

55 ★★★★★ reviews
18 ★★★★ reviews
11 ★★★★★ reviews
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TC Tahoe Re-Thinks Vol. 9: Out To Lunch

reviewed by Christian Fisanick (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Sunday 17 April, 2016)

TC Tahoe Re-Thinks Vol. 9: Out To LunchTC's stuff is always excellent, but I would save my money and get the expanded version of this material called Lunch is Served, co-written with Paul Romhany. It has these routines and so much more. (One contributed by Banachek called "No Stars" is simply amazing, possibly the single most creative use of the OTL principle.) Unfortunately, it's not available as an ebook.


Predictionary

reviewed by Christian Fisanick (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Sunday 17 April, 2016)

PredictionaryI chuckled out loud when I read what the gimmick was and said to myself, "No way. This won't play at all." Then I made the gimmick (It will cost a couple of bucks in material and the use of a Sharpie), played with it, and thought, "Way! Way cool. It's a keeper." And then I made a backup gimmick. The handling will take a little practice, but this thing can be used as quite the utility device for predictions. In case you are wondering, no, it's not a force. The spectator makes a completely free choice. I use it with a small 40,000-word pocket dictionary. (I have a few of those in my bag, including a gaffed one to do Annemann's 40,000 Words effect.) You can look around to see if you can find the full trick with pre-made gimmicks, but I wouldn't waste time and money. Just download the incredibly reasonable ebook and get going. Work on it, and you'll have a super-nice parlor or stage effect, using a classic routine too. Highly recommended!


Simplex Magazine Test

reviewed by Christian Fisanick (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Saturday 16 April, 2016)

Simplex Magazine TestFor $6, this is a great magazine test that is worth much, much more. Get a couple of different magazines, spend about 20 minutes preparing, and you are ready to go. (I use copies of two Mensa magazines. Seems appropriate. :)) It uses an old book-test principle, but once again, Devin has put together a dynamite effect that will work for close-up, parlor, or stage.


Credit Card Divination

reviewed by Christian Fisanick (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Saturday 16 April, 2016)

Credit Card DivinationThis is a nice completely impromptu effect--within certain limitations. While I knew the "theory" behind it--I think that it's in one of Jon Thompson's Naked Mentalism books--but the working is extremely clever. OK, being able to figure out Mastercard, VISA, American Express, or Diner's Club, by itself, isn't spectacular, but I think that if you do it a couple of times with different folks, it will play well.


Liebrary

reviewed by Christian Fisanick (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Saturday 16 April, 2016)

LiebraryOver the past few years, I've looked at a few dozen smartphone effects. None of them really work for me because they all just scream, "The app does the effect." With ebooks now being commonplace, an ebook test seems entirely appropriate. And this one is terrific. It looks suspicion-free. There is no special app involved. Have somebody pick one of seven PDF books (no shenanigans here, it's a free choice) and then punch in random page number (also a free choice). You immediately can predict the first word on any page in any of the seven books. (Well, almost every page...) The method is ancient, but the styling is new. For a modern close-up book test, with just a little bit of audience management, this is fantastic. Heck, you can even keep the ebooks in cloud storage and download the chosen ebook to the spectator's smartphone or tablet and use his PDF reader app. Did I mention that the entire method takes about three sentences to explain? At 15 clams, this is a bargain for the minds you can blow.


The Book of Book Tests

reviewed by Christian Fisanick (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Thursday 14 January, 2016)

The Book of Book TestsI'm always torn about book tests. While I often admire a clever principle behind a test, book tests to me come off as kind of impersonal mentalism. Here's this book. We get this page. I give you the word. That said, there are hundreds of different tests, mostly falling into three categories: those that use a gimmicked book or books, a mathematical force, or just outright bold and brazen deception. (David Hoy's book test and Marc Paul's Triple A book test immediately come to mind and make me chuckle. It's amazing what you can get away with using a good performance. For some performers and performances, either one of those is good enough. They take skill but cost nothing in terms of gimmicks, cribs, and mental challenge.) Anyway, this is a great collection of 20 different book tests using different techniques. You won't use all or most of them. Personally, I'm not a fan of longwinded calculations that get you to a page and word because they always come off as what they really are, that is, using a forcing formula, but you'll definitely find something to like here. (I think that the test using the loaded die is quite clever and something that I'd never thought about before.) And for $10--50 cents per test--the book is a bargain.

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