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Shuddershadow Mansion

reviewed by Jim Kasmir (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Friday 23 February, 2007)

Shuddershadow MansionI thoroughly enjoyed this well-written ebook from Mark Piazza. The accent is on presentation, which should come as no surprise to learned students of the bizarre. Variety is abundant. Inside Shuddershadow Mansion lurk routines so dark that I would not suggest performing them at your next restaurant gig, yet there are whimsical effects suitable for all ages. One of my favorites is a chilling prediction effect entitled 'Timmy's Toy Chest' that could definitely become part of a longer seance. Then there is the comedic routine involving three ghostly stooges (or four, depending on how you perform it!). There is also a chapter of useful ideas for putting together a Poe Seance. I found the humor in this book refreshing and urge you to check it out. I don't think you'll be disappointed.


The Invisible Pass

reviewed by Feras A. Alkharboush (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Thursday 15 February, 2007)

The Invisible PassThis is pure gem. This booklet is quite known to the knowledgable magicians ( Richard Kaufman mentions it in his DVD, "On The Pass" ). I'm a fan of Braue and Hugard books ( Expert Card technique, Royal Road and Miracle methods ), so I had to get this. As always, Braue and Hugard maintain the high quality work in their material.

This Pass is a variation on the Herrmann Pass, although what’s different is the unique mechanics of the move. Users of the standard Turn-over pass ( the first pass taught in Expert Card Technique ) know that there is a flash, which can be observed to the close observer. This one IS Invisible, the cover is perfect. It can be done almost surrounded ( although from the left and the back angles, "something" WILL be noticed, its like the standard turn-over pass ). It is invisible as long its below eyes' level ( somewhat like the standard turn-over ).

The mechanism is new, and it will awhile to make it smooth. I'm writing this review after about 4 months of buying the ebook, and now I can do it quite well.

If you are a serious card handler, you want to learn this pass. The teaching is EXCELLENT ( the whole booklet is only for one move .. ). There are photographs ( not illustrations ) in EVERY page, along with the description. Then, Hugard goes into some notes regarding the pass, then you see some illustrations ( for those who love them more than photographs! ).

This baby is a joy to perform. Five Stars, fully deserved.

4 bucks? Maaaan ..


The Art of Chapeaugraphy

reviewed by Stan Sieler (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Sunday 28 January, 2007)

The Art of ChapeaugraphySomewhat disappointing pamphlet. In some cases, it looks like the hat created is larger than would be possible with the given starting piece of fabric. Some hats require the aid of a "clip". There are about 25 hats described. The book comes in HTML format and is 15 web pages.


Compendia

reviewed by Todd Landman
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Saturday 20 January, 2007)

CompendiaDaniel Young is a fantastic young mentalist with superb ideas that take 'lateral' thinking to a new dimension. This collection of works is outstanding and should be in every mentalist's collection. I have read these through and through, and I have adopted one of his methods in the development of my own ideas. These are fresh and strong effects that will play well in a variety of performance settings. His work is akin to that of Looch, author of Simple and Direct (SAD) mentalism. Get this collection now and start performing the impossible.


7

reviewed by Andrew Loh
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Monday 04 December, 2006)

7Title: 7 Author: Peter Duffie Category: Cards and mentalism Pages: 48 Price: $15 ------------------------------------------

Here's my honest review of Peter Duffie's new ebook - 7. It's a collection of 7 effects plus a bonus effect which I believe one of the best or favourite in this ebook. This ebook covers both card magic, diary tricks, predictions, etc. Most of the materials are usable.

Without wasting time, I will take some time to break down and review each of the effects as following:

Automatic Gambler ----------------------

This is a very nice routine. I am not a big fan of gambling tricks, but after reading Peter's version, I think I will certainly give it a try. I really like the idea where the Aces vanish visually and spectator deal themselves with the four Aces in their hand which I thought very strong. I like it!

Satanic Writes --------------

Another excellent diary routine from Peter, I should say really amazing or really freak people out! I enjoyed Peter's previous diary tricks such as "Mind Master", "Devious Dates", etc and this one is really something different and it's a very strong routine.

Klektors ---------

This effect is one of the best, very direct and I am a big fan of Walton's The Collectors plot. I have read numerous Peter's version in many sources in his ebooks such as "With cards", "Card School", "Covert Concepts", Jason Alford's "Cyber Sessions", and etc, and I like this version a lot. This version is very direct and definitely will add this routine in my repertoire.

Jack of All Trade-offs ------------------------

A nice routine, it's a prediction effect that based on Dave Campbell's FRED trick. Very easy to do and it's a small packet trick.

Off-Centre Point -------------------

This is something very unique and interesting. In appearance, it seems you share the secret knowledge of locating spectator's selection at its location. At the end, somehow their selection amazingly rises to the of the deck.

Laughing Queens -------------------

When comes to anything related about Oil and Queens by Roy Walton, I will certainly will have the interest of the routine. I watched Peter's Laughing Queens clip quite some few years ago and I liked it. This version eliminates the Hamman Count and it's more streamline. This effect immediately added in my repertoire. I really like it.

Paradise Found -----------------

This routine is very entertaining and combined with the interesting patter. I really like the ending part which I thought it has a surprise climax and it's nice finished for the routine. It's a kind of routine that very enjoyable to perform.

Snap Happy (Bonus Effect) -------------------------------

I think this effect alone worth the price of this ebook and Peter was very kind to offer this as a bonus. I really like this a lot, I have performed this many times with my friends today and the reaction was so overwhelming. This effect is very visual transposition in apperance and best of all, in this effect, it can be done no special setup and as an impromptu nature. Just four cards and you would be able to astonish people with this small packet trick.

There you go and thanks for reading.

In closing, I would like to say one thing, just purchase this ebook and you will not be disappointed. I have added a lot of effects into my repertoire. I believe the materials in this ebook are something for everyone and I am sure there are 4 or 5 effects that you will actually use.

High Recommended!

Ratings: 9/10


Show Stoppers with Cards

reviewed by Feras A. Alkharboush (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Friday 01 December, 2006)

Show Stoppers with CardsThis is one hidden gem. I just cant recommend this one enough. For 1.5$? C'mon!

Here are some of the effects/sleights you will learn:

1- Braue Double Lift: A super clean Double/Triple lift with NO get ready. Its the FIRST time I see this double .. its not even in Greg Wilson's DVD Double Take .. !

2- Homing Card: A group of cards are fanned, a card is discared, the cards are fanned again .. and the card is still there !! This is done couple of times!

3- A card is selected and shuffled in the deck. The performer shows and deals 3 cards .. and the selected card is one of them! He still doesnt know the selected card though .. he deals a forth card .. and its the selected card! Spectators rush to the 3 cards dealt before, and of course, the selected card is not anyone of them.

4- a Fan false count. You can count seven or ten cards as five .. or any number less than it ( depends on the stack ).

5- 4 cards are selected and shuffled in the deck. The performer cuts the deck 4 times, finding each card and deals it. After discovering all the four cards and dealing them .. spectator discovers that the 4 cards are all Aces!

These are my fav.s .. there are some tricks in the book. For 1.5$? Why not getting it?!


Tragic Magic

reviewed by Anonymous
Rating: ★★★★ (Date Added: Monday 27 November, 2006)

Tragic MagicWell at least for my $4.00 I worked out why it's titled "Tragic Magic". (Apparently not the original title but came to be named so by its legion of happy readers......not.) Old texts at a low cost cannot be expected to provide anything approaching a well rounded introduction to conjuring for the beginner or a polished source of material for the experienced practitioner. Although cited as having 122 pages when transposed to A4 the printout is 58. Of that a substantial use of space is used by Mr. Leat to lecture on the apparently poor ethics of his fellow colleagues. His approach to his craft rests on negativity toward anything other than his own ego and self righteousness. Many of the routines are in pre development form with the author passing only opinion regarding their viability (the promotional disappearing "Pail of Water"). Mr. Leat explains in the introduction that the book will be a vehicle for his verse/poetry (about 25% of the book), I found the remainder devoted to hypnotizing roosters and describing a con using three "dancing" mussels without their shells threaded on a piece of cotton. Now in case you consider the reviewer to be as negative as Mr. Leat I did consider the placement of a four inch dice into an empty hat with the subsequent production of a glass of wine, cigars, powder puff and a 16 inch by 12 inch cross suitably covered in flowers so as to give the appearance of a wreath which reflected a "Rakes" life and demise of some value. (Page 7) Although I read the whole book I considered going beyond page 8 was of little value.


Greed

reviewed by Steven S
Rating: ★★★★ (Date Added: Monday 20 November, 2006)

GreedExcellant effect. Another masterpiece from Danny... Heres the effect. You show a $1 Front and back (really!). Then, you fold it in half. After a simple and quick wave of your hand, it changes to the $5 bill. Really, it is only a wave. Nothing more. Then, you fold the $5 in half. After another wave, it turns to a $10...seriously. Just snap your fingers, and then you have a $20. Then, after a little shake, you have a fully examinable 50 cent piece. Or, if you want to give it away, I sometimes use a quarter. And I always end with the perfect line... "DON'T GET GREEDY!".

This is an awesome effect...the only downfalls are it will cost you $7 to make the gimmick. But after that, it will last you for years. No lie. But get this, it is unbelievable. Seriously.


Practical Mental Effects

reviewed by Feras A. Alkharboush (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Friday 10 November, 2006)

Practical Mental Effects6$ .. and you get one of the best mentalism books out there.

This book is FILLED with material, which are all clever and practical.

It has sections on bullets, cards, large mental stunts, and lots of other categories. I highly recommend getting this book. The best mentalism book I have.

By the way, if you have the brainwave deck, this book will teach you killer routines with it. Plus, it will teach you how to make your own deck.


Annemann's Card Magic

reviewed by Feras A. Alkharboush (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Friday 10 November, 2006)

Annemann's Card MagicSimply, a GEM. You get 155 card effects. Not all are anywhere anytime. But most of them are ( the ones contained in the second book ).

I read all the effects. Some of them are of those little pieces that you do when asked for a trick. Others. however, are very good, and worth the price of this book alone, or even more.

Go for it. You will enjoy performing these effects. I did.


Money Magic

reviewed by solrak29
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Saturday 14 October, 2006)

Money MagicI purchased this in search of ideas for some good effects to do with paper money. I found this one littered with some good ideas and for the price you have nothing to lose. I definately would say, to the beginning magician, to purchase this to gain some ideas on doing some magic with paper money. For some it may be difficult to read unless your familiar with some basic concepts in magic. I think the more advanced magician may not find this too interesting, but there are some hidden gems in here.


Greed

reviewed by solrak29
Rating: ★★★★ (Date Added: Saturday 14 October, 2006)

GreedI purchased this downloadable version of GREED because I am impatient in waiting for the DVD, and the price is just right. The effect is powerfull, as Kosta Kimslat performed this on Virtual Magician show on the discover channel (thanks Dave, for pointing this out). To make, it is not hard, but you must take care and look at the pictures. The inherant cost of this can be replaced in performance and taking the other pieces to the bank.

This basic effect is self working but requires practice. Sleight of hand is required to begin and end clean. I would say you should be at the intermediate level and have some performance experience for this effect.


PK Revolution

reviewed by Feras A. Alkharboush (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★ (Date Added: Friday 06 October, 2006)

PK RevolutionI havent perform these yet, but from what I read, this material is really good.

Unfortunatly, none of these can be signed, although can easliy be borrowed, except the key bend effect. But, who cares? the first effect, for example, the coin almost never leav their view.

Teaching? Pretty good! altough some of sleights are not described well enough, or maybe because I just have NO PREVIOUS knowledge or coin sleights. But you can learn it from here, with little work. Of course, the text is full with photos to help you. Excellent.

Hard? nah, infact, they are all easy if you can do coin sleights. I never did coin magic, now I will.

Creative, for 6.5$, its really good.

I'm sure that you will add these effects to your PK routines. I recommend getting this ebook, such a great price.


Clever Card Tricks

reviewed by Feras A. Alkharboush (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Monday 02 October, 2006)

Clever Card TricksI got to say, these tricks ARE clever. NOT the effect, but the METHODs to produce the effect.

The effects .. well ... are what you expect when you pay 1.5$. not top notch, I use one effect ( which is a great one .. if presented properly ). Other than that .. I dont even care for the others.

For 1.50$? nice.


Card Control

reviewed by Feras A. Alkharboush (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Monday 02 October, 2006)

Card ControlThe book is PURE GOLD.

You know when they say: old gems? you got them all in here. These are the controls you will use!

Very advanced moves in here though. You got to have to experiance with a deck of cards. I finished Royal Road, and I can uderstand Arthur's explinations easily! I didn'n think I'm a book learner!

Altough explinations are good, some moves are hard, REALLY hard. Needs a practice.

For 5 Bucks? You cant beat that. Highly recommended


Untitled

reviewed by Matt Cummings
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Friday 23 June, 2006)

UntitledFirst reaction after reading this:

"Wow"

Scott is a great thinker, his stories, his advice, his tricks, his methods are all achievable. This ebook is genius and well underpriced.

His presentation on revealing thoughts was pure genius.

Hype has a lot of potential.

You'll get some card effects, an interesting chair prediction test, a bullet catch, tons of advice, all for 18 bucks. This man is crazy.


The Sphinx

reviewed by Dustin Stinett
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Sunday 04 June, 2006)

The SphinxSometime in my teens (during the 1970s) I became fascinated with old magic periodicals. They are little self-contained time machines: an easy trip in Mr. Peabody’s Way-Back Machine to times remembered by few but, thankfully because of these periodicals, never lost.

I began buying the reprinted copies of The Phoenix, The Jinx and other readily available works. Somewhere along the line I learned about The Sphinx and ignorantly wondered when a reprint of it would become available. It wasn’t until I became a member of the Magic Castle and I saw the complete file in the library that I fully grasped the enormity of the magazine. I realized that there was little chance that it would ever be reprinted. I decided that I was going to have to buy a complete file. Acquiring a file of The Sphinx became, so to speak, my “Holy Grail.”

“He who would cross this bridge must answer me these questions three, ere the other side ye shall see!”

Ask your questions, bridge-keeper!

“What is your quest?”

I seek a complete file of The Sphinx!

“What is your desire: bound or loose?”

It doesn’t matter! I’ll take either one!

“What is your bank balance?”

Oh boy.

I quickly learned that money would be an issue in my quest; a major issue. So, for many years, I resigned myself to visits with Mr. Peabody and his Way-Back Machine during trips to the Magic Castle. For over twenty years, every time I visited, I looked at the light green clothbound volumes with longing.

So what is so special about this magazine that acquiring a file could become an obsession?

The Sphinx was published during the first half of the 20th century. This period of time covers much of the “Golden Age of Magic,” from its peak through to its demise, and it is well chronicled within the pages of this astounding magazine. In its pages we see Harry Houdini rise to fame, reinvent himself as needed, and then his untimely death. We can follow the careers of Kellar, Thurston, Dante, Germain, Malini, LeRoy and so many others. Fifty-plus years of magic history at our fingertips: I get shivers just thinking about it. Fifty years of magic journalism that captures the modern growth of a once great performance art (that was a cornerstone of show business) to its fall into mediocrity as a mere amusement and hobby. (It was then Genii magazine that chronicled magic’s partial resurrection.)

One of the great challenges of flipping through the pages of The Sphinx was pointed out to me by Mike Caveney: “I defy anyone to be able to go through that magazine and not get distracted.” Sure enough: You start in on one article, perhaps on a specific subject you are researching, and pretty soon you find yourself wandering off into other interesting worlds. The advertisements alone are an absolute joy to read!

I had to get a file of that magazine!

But then there was that whole money thing, and as time wore on, the price of complete files—when they became available—increased as my trips to the Castle decreased. Then an interesting thing happened: Somebody actually took the time to scan every page—nearly 17,000 of them—and put it on some little silver discs I could shove into my computer. Now I had some real soul searching to do. I am a casehardened book guy. One of the pleasures I get from looking through The Sphinx is visceral: I love the idea that a page I just turned is anywhere from fifty to one-hundred years old! And I guess I just love the smell and feel of deteriorating paper (many years of The Sphinx were printed on less than high-grade paper). “The text is on the discs; but it’s just not the same thing,” I told myself. But the price was right; frankly, this looked like my best opportunity to at least come close to my quest.

Then a miracle happened. I stepped into the dealer’s room of a magic collectors’ convention and something caught my attention. There were the sounds of angels singing and a wondrous light radiating from one corner of the room. Within this glow lay an unbelievable sight: My Holy Grail! It was a gorgeously bound, complete file of The Sphinx. The man selling them, who was dressed in flowing white robes, beckoned me. I went to him asked the price; he answered. It dawned on me that, at that time, I did have the money: I could acquire this treasure! “But I have a guy on a cruise ship right now who is interested,” he said. “I can have a cashier’s check here today,” I said. “You have first right of refusal after the guy on the ship,” was his answer.

Okay, so I’m exaggerating: The seller wasn’t wearing white robes.

Before we sealed the deal, I talked with many trusted advisors. Several said, “Get them; it’s a good price.” One said, “What? Are you nuts? Get he digital edition!” The best advice I got came in the form of a question:

“What is your goal?” (“…answer me these questions three…”)

I want the magazine! I want to read it and touch it and smell it! I’ve wanted this for a very long time. I had the answer to all three of the questions that would see me to the other side of the bridge.

The guy on the ship passed and the magazines were mine. So the wondrous glow and sound of angels singing now radiates from my library shelves.

One day I was working under a deadline (something I never had to deal with in my past) and turned to my treasure for some research. The indices of The Sphinx are adequate, but not perfect. So, as is usually the case, I dialed down to a year and began looking through issues. The mixing of love and work is intoxicating! And I promptly failed the challenge offered by Mike Caveney: I was distracted. But I couldn’t afford to be distracted! I was under a deadline! For the first time ever, time became an issue.

I found what I was looking for and completed my project. But I realized I had to do something radical for a casehardened book-guy: I would acquire a copy of The Digital Sphinx to complement my real file. Now, when time (which runs faster the older you get) becomes an issue, I can save a lot by using the search capabilities of the PDF files. A list of entries for my subject quickly appears on my computer screen and in a mouse click I am reading what I need to read. Acquiring the bound file of The Sphinx was a miracle for Dustin the collector and lover of books and magazines. But The Digital Sphinx is a miracle of modern technology for the time-challenged multiple job-holding Dustin.

I know that my historian-collector friends reading this now are shaking their heads in dismay, but I beg them to consider my plight. And, it’s not like I have given up on my treasure: Not at all! In fact, it’s become more of a treasure. I now have the best of both worlds. I can still get lost in the never-ending trails one finds leafing through the magazine; discovering forgotten names and events. And I can use it more efficiently; recording every aspect of a subject without missing some important, but hidden factoid that might be missed during a page-by-page search. To borrow a phrase, the “tapestry of time” that is the history of magic deserves our best, most efficient effort when we are attempting to add to it or put the threads into the right place. As researchers, it is incumbent on us to use the best tools available to make sure we get it right.

Is The Digital Sphinx only for serious historians? Again, not at all! Anyone who loves this art will love rummaging through the pages—electronic or otherwise—of The Sphinx. There are many hundreds of effects, many that have not seen the lights of the stage or the close-up table in decades. “Something new” for your act can very easily be something old enough to be new again!

The treasures of The Sphinx were once available only to those who had (or had access to) a complete file; and they probably paid a hefty price for it. Now, this Holy Grail of Magic is available for a fraction of the cost of what a complete, bound file will cost you.

Don’t get me wrong: If you have the means, go out and find a complete file and relish in its visceral glory. Enjoy, as I do, the smell and feel of old paper coupled with the intellectual wonder of discovery every time you turn a page that is as much as one hundred years old! But, if acquiring a file is just not in the realm of possibilities, but you still want the intellectual pleasures of owning an entire file of The Sphinx, then The Digital Sphinx is most certainly for you.


Greed

reviewed by Keith Kegerreis
Rating: ★★★★ (Date Added: Wednesday 26 April, 2006)

GreedThis trick is very visual. However, the setup and gimmick can be timely. And, if you dont do it right, could cost you a 20 dollar bill. Once you get it all set up, however, the moves are very simple and easy to perform. The end trick requires some sleight of hand but should get it down with a little practice. A good buy for a magician with some background in magic.


The Dark Waltz

reviewed by Mark Piazza (confirmed purchase)
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Tuesday 18 April, 2006)

The Dark WaltzCaptivating routines and even better theory to digest. I especially was enlightened by the chapters titled Ritual, The Light Seance and The Liquid Lense. The ideas in Setting The Stage are the missing links that I was looking for to make a portable seance session seem Victorian in nature. The Latex Hounds of Hell, To Control A Thousand Minds and Red Jack were among my other favs. Also a terrific idea starter. The Dark Waltz sits on my bookshelf right between Spirit Theatre and New Invocation, where it rightly belongs! Great job, Michael!


Phoenix Rising

reviewed by Bill Douglas
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Monday 03 April, 2006)

Phoenix RisingThis manuscript is awesome. James Watkins is a very clever guy. This effect has a profound impact with no "difficult handling". A little ability to misdirect (the steps in the routine do most of this) and some intermediate skill with cards is all that is required to knock the socks off of people. Mr Watkins gives the reader enormus directions for the primary and alternate handlings. It is rare in magic that one will get so much to add to their repretoire for only $6.00. I highly recommend this ebook.


Online Poker Mastery

reviewed by Danny Brenner
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Tuesday 28 March, 2006)

Online Poker MasteryMy Book will show you step-by-step how to be an Online Poker shark. Discussing odds and strategies, it is sure to increase your bankroll. Hundreds of satisfied customers can't be wrong!


Untitled

reviewed by Richard Waters
Rating: ★★★★ (Date Added: Sunday 26 March, 2006)

UntitledThe effects are clean and simple with an emphasis on the performance and making something that the audience will remember and that, in my opinion, is what its all about. I don't think anybody could be disapointed after reading and performing the effects in this book.

For someone that has some training in business - like I do - the business plans are a little basic... ...but then again, there were a few things even I took away from this book that Im sure will help me as well. A lot of magicians/mentalists dont have any training in business and this book would be a very good start!

The writing style is not something a lot of people will find easy to get into but I think this is where the book might stand out - it makes you want to read it a second time and "catch" what you might have missed the first time, and youre bound to find something new the second time around.

I have already started practicing "BULL" to add to my parlour/restaurant shows and "CHAIR'ISHED" for my stage show - Im sure they will go over well!

This is by no means a "basic book" and I wouldnt recommend it for beginners at all as some sections expect you to know certain effects and principals - but for intermediate to advanced magicians/mentalists, Im sure they will love this!


The Dark Waltz

reviewed by Clifford The Red
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Friday 17 March, 2006)

The Dark WaltzI have been waiting for this one for a long time.

I bought this immediately upon hearing about it and have been thoroughly enjoying it. Michael is my kind of thinker - deep and a bit twisted :-) In his book he shares the creative flow of his show along with his wonderful effects. I will never look down on balloon dogs again. Bravo!! The production value of the eBook is also very high, this is a print-ready ebook, full type-set, photos and illustrations. I highly recommend this!

Thus spake The Red


Our Magic

reviewed by Martin Christopher
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Thursday 16 March, 2006)

Our MagicThis book is excellent if you care about magic as an art. I particularly enjoy the discussion on "effects of transition," that is tricks like the blooming bush and houdin's orange tree. this would also include the egg on fan and tabary's rope routine, etc.


Cardeceits

reviewed by Neo Magic
Rating: ★★★★★ (Date Added: Monday 13 March, 2006)

CardeceitsName: Cardeceits Author: Peter Duffie Type: Card Magic Format: eBook No. of Effects: 17 Difficulty: 3-4/5

Peter Duffie's card magic is ingenious, entertaining and inspirational. Described as "one of the world's most creative cardmen" his books and effects appeal to card fanatics of all abilities and tastes. Invariably, we all bring our own preferences, likes and dislikes to any work of this kind. That being said, there's nothing in Cardeceits that I particularly dislike.

Caveat Emptor: A good number of effects in Cardeceits will require diligent practice. They are not for beginners. And in some cases Cardeceits assumes that you are already familiar with certain sleights/controls, including, for example, the Tilt (2 effects), Elmsley Count (1 effect), Jordan Count (1 effect), Second Deal (1 effect), Vernon Add-on (2 effects), Riffle Pass (1 effect), Turnover Pass (1 effect), Half Pass (1 effect), Diagonal Palm Shift (1 effect), Slip Cut (1 effect). If you've been looking for an incentive to work on some of these moves, these effects are sure to provide it. Other necessary moves, such as ATFUS (1 effect) and the Benzais Deal Steal (1 effect), are briefly described.

My observations are as follows:

A Pain in the Ace: Requires minimal setup. A quick, snappy effect to open any routine, particularly if you continue with the Aces for other four Ace tricks.

The ROLEX Gang: "Rolex" in the title is a nod to Roy Walton and Alex Elmsley. It's a bit of a toughie, but you'll be rewarded with a wonderful effect if you are prepared to put in the practice. Read the description and you'll see why this is worth every effort.

Garden Path II: No significant setup required. And as the name suggests, you'll be leading the audience up the veritable garden path with this one! They'll think you're way off target with your predictions until you reveal, to their astonishment, that everything was under control all along! Nice idea.

Inside Out: No significant setup required. No description is provided in the advertising, so here's what happens: A priceless cargo (say the Ace of Spades) is sandwiched between and guarded by two Jacks. These three cards are under a spectator's hand. A robbery commences, the deck is dropped leaving three cards in the performer's hand. It's the two Jacks along with the Ace of Spades! The spectator lifts his hand to find three replicas of the cargo - the other three Aces.

New Hue View: The Charles Jordan Riffle Shuffle Principle will make you smile. This is one of my personal favourite effects from Cardeceits - it also happens to be one of the easier items.

Between Queens: Can be performed impromptu. But another toughie. Interesting use of the Kelly Bottom Placement.

Bad Influence: Virtually impromptu. A wonderful effect that works and handles as strongly as described. Peter Duffie himself writes: "Despite (or because of) the simple means used to achieve this effect, it is quite effective." I couldn't agree more..

More Convivial: Was once offfered as a free taster on Peter Duffie's web site. It might still be available there.

Card of Darkness: Can be done impromptu. A simple method, coupled with dramatic presentation, gives a worthwhile experiment in the Occult. If your palming isn't up to scratch, you should be able to work out an alternative method to get the desired effect.

Deal Steal Collectors: You probably won't come across the Benzais Deal Steal too often in your travels. An effective "collectors" routine. Prepare to put in the practice.

Counting the Maze Way: An ingenious method. If your dealing is up to scratch, you'll be performing this one for sure.

Mini-Hellraiser: Can be performed impromptu, with no overly difficult moves. I'll add something to the description: An Ace, Two and Three are held by the spectator. The performer holds two Kings. The Ace is taken and placed beneath the two Kings but it jumps back to the top. This is repeated for the Two and Three. You are left holding two Kings which you place on top of the spectator's cards. He deals the cards down to find that all three - Three, Two and Ace - have risen through the Kings yet again! Very enjoyable.

An Imposition: A math-based effect that's easy to do. Uses basic principles to not only - and apparently quite randomly - arrive at the value and suit of a selected card, but also its exact position in the deck.

Crime Suspect: No difficult moves. It takes time to get to the selected card but it allows plenty of opportunity to inject your own patter as you turn cards face up.

Three Down - One to Go: Certain to get good reactions. Again, not overly difficult. It's taught slightly differently to the description. At the end you hold three cards face down in your hand, one of which is the selection as confirmed by the spectator. You toss two of them face up to one side - the spectator doesn't see his card among these so he naturally assumes you still have the selection in your hand (nothing too magical about that!). Until, that is, you proceed to reveal the chosen card with a surprise kicker ending!

Suit Yourself Too: Two spectators freely reverse four cards each in a sixteen card face-up packet. That leaves the performer with eight cards of his own, still face-up. The cards are shuffled. The eight face down selected cards are removed, and tabled face down. The remaining eight - the performer's - are also tabled, face down. The top cards of each pile are turned over simultaneously to show matching suits - both packets are in suit identical order! Another lovely effect. Also easy to do.

Ulti-Print!: The only effect that calls for gaffed cards. Two handlings are offered, one for experts only!

There's sure to be something here for everyone.

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